Sweet potato chicken adobo stuffed Pandesal ( pan-de-sal)

Hi everyone!

I want to introduced our Filipino bread rolled we called this pandesal. I inspired to make these bread because of my father.

I grow up in a small place in Philippines most of the work is usually farming. Bread, coffee, rice, and of course the most popular our Filipino dishes adobo all of these are very often to our table for breakfast.

My dad is a farmer so most of our ingredients like seasonal fruit, eggs, sweet potato even fresh chicken meat are fresh from his farm. My father always wished that someday one of  his daughter can bake fresh bread every morning for his breakfast. And now I will make it happened!

20170121_171639I’ll try so many times to make this bread but I always failed. So  I decided to make my own recipes for this bread (pan-de-sal) and it come out so perfected.

And now I will show you how can make this  Filipino traditional bread rolled pandesal….

Come and join me……..

For the stuffed of pandesal:

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235 g  chicken breast can or fresh

355 g  sweet potato peeled and cut into cube

30 g  white or red onion

2 pcs  clove garlic

450 g  water

50 g  olive oil

35 g soy sauce

green onion

black pepper

salt

20 pcs. quail egg (optional)

Instruction:

Heat the pan put olive oil. Saute the onion and garlic add soy sauce and then chicken. Cover the pan and cook for 4 minutes. Stir and put the water followed by sweet potato. Let it cook until the sweet is half cooked. Then add the black pepper and salt. Let it cool at room temperature.

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For the Dough:

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2 pcs. whole eggs

680 g all purpose flour

365 g bread flour

76 g granulated sugar

30 g fresh yeast

8 g salt

45 g butter unsalted ( room temp)

285 g fresh milk 2%

300 g top water

230 g bread crumbs

Instruction:

Preheat your oven to 375 F.

Warm the milk and dissolve the fresh yeast.

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In the mixing bowl put the water and salt. Combine the all purpose flour, bread flour and sugar use the wooden spoon to mix. Add in the mixer followed by milk, yeast and eggs.20170121_142931

Mix for 2 minutes on slow speed.

20170121_142945Scrape down and mix for 4 minutes.

20170121_143154 Remove from the bowl and continue mixing by hand for 1 minute.

Place it the stainless bowl and cover it and rest it for 30 minutes.

After 30 minutes, cut the dough and divide it. Each dough weight at 100g. Cover it with the plastic for 15 minutes.

After 15 minutes, flat it the dough and put the stuffed in the center. Use the water on the side of the dough to seal it and rest it for another 15 minutes before baking.

Spray the dough with water and rolled it in the bread crumbs before you bake.20170121_170629-2

Bake it for 20 minutes.

Your finished product!……………

 

Cavacas

(The Portuguese Popover)

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From my Avo’s kitchen to yours!  Cavacas are a hard sweet bread served during holidays or celebrations, however my family enjoys these anytime!

Traditionally in Portugal they would be distributed to the less fortunate as payment of promises made to São Gonçalinho, who was a 13th century parish priest known as a matchmaker and healer of bone diseases. Saint

Every January in his honor hundreds of people gather in Aveiro, Portugal to celebrate the Festival of São Gonçalinho.  They crowd the streets in front of  Capel de São Gonçalo and wait for the bells to ring which signifies the start of  Tossing of Cavacas .

“The streets that surround the chapel are filled with people whenever you hear the bells ringing, a sign that the cavacas will start to rain. At the top of the chapel, several people, loaded with sacks of cavacas and in fulfillment of their promises, throw the candy, one by one, before multitudes who step on and push in an attempt to catch as many as possible.  Lack of experience can result in a major bruise….  Those who take the “catch” seriously are suitably equipped with upside-down umbrellas, shrimps, giant fishing nets and all kinds of manually constructed utensils that allow them to catch the flying cavacas.”

Festival Article

 

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Now it’s your turn!

What you will need:

Cavacas

2 cups of all purpose flour

1 cup olive oil

1/2 cup milk (room temperature)

8 eggs (room temperature)

Glaze

2 cups icing sugar

Zest of 1 lemon

Zest of 1 orange

5-6 tablespoons of milk

1 teaspoon of lemon juice

To get started:

Cavacas

1) Preheat oven to 350°

2) Combine all ingredients into bowl, beat with electric mixer (medium high speed) for 20 minutes

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3) Spray muffin tins, fill halfway with batter

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4) Bake on middle rack at 350° for 40 minutes.  (Do not open the oven door until fully baked or else the cavacas will collapse!)

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Glaze

1) Mix icing sugar, lemon zest, orange zest, milk and lemon juice until smooth

2) Glaze popovers while still warm and let cool

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You can serve these with tea or coffee (or a shot of Port wine… YUM)

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ENJOY AND BON SABOR!

~Kennedy

Maamoul with dates and pistachio

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Maamoul is a very old middle eastern treat. People always eat it at special occasion for Christian its easter . And for muslims its Ramadan. In the Middle East dates grown locally and muslim eats dates when they break fasting its a traditional that goes back for years.

 

For cookie dough you gonna need:

Semolina 140g

Shredded  un-sweeten coconut 60g

Milk 100g

Butter 280g

Icing sugar 150g

All purpose flour 280g

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Method:

Cream the butter and icing sugar on 1 speed for 1 minute.

 

Then add the flour, semolina, shredded  un-sweeten coconut in a mixing bowl, add milk and mix it all together.

Let the dough rest for 30 minutes in the cooler.

For dates fillings:

Pitted dates 500g

Water 420g

Pistachio 150g

Method:

Clean the pistachio remove the shells thoroughly. Combine the water and dates. Cook on a low heat, constantly stirring until it become sticky. Preheat the oven to 350 F. Bake the maamoul cookies for 8 to 12 minutes always check the bottom of the cookies if its golden brown means the cookies are baked.

Cupqueen

The daily question; You own a business? How old are you?

Well today I will tell you about how I came into this amazing opportunity at only 20 years old with Flirt Cupcakes.

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My business partner Michelle LeMoignan and I when I first bought into Flirt Cupcakes. (2013) 

I was working for Michelle and her business partner Rick for almost a year baking and looking after the Jasper Ave location before becoming a partner myself. Michelle and Rick had started Flirt Cupcakes 6 years prior to my entering the picture.

One day Rick came into the shop and told me he was looking to sell his shares, it was time for him to move on and he wanted to let me know first if I had any interest. At 20 years old I really hadn’t given too much thought into owning a business this soon, it seemed like a far away dream only attainable after years of school and planning…and money. I thanked him and told him these thoughts and that would have been the end of that. I brought this conversation with Rick up at a family dinner some time later. My grandmother then pulled me aside to tell me that all of the grandchildren are getting quite a large inheritance. She tells me I will get mine now if I plan on buying the business… The rest is history.

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Cupcakes out for delivery!

I learn and grow from the business every single day. There have been many good days as well as bad ones. You learn quickly there are no sick days when the shop needs to be opened, you are the one to answer to the angry woman who asked for pink, not purple buttercream! But you are also the one to create new flavours, meet amazing people through marketing and events, choose employees that you appreciate as much as they appreciate you and so so much more.

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Art for the shop done by talented friend Molly Little.

The biggest lessons were the hard slow months where Michelle and I wouldn’t pay ourselves so we could afford groceries for the shop, pay our employees, etc. Recession hits hard for small business’. Michelle and I put our heads together and pushed through some very scary and shaky times in 2015. We soon made the decision to shut down one of our locations, (a terrifying decision!), we crossed our fingers that we would lose the extra costs but not the customers. And lo and behold 2016 was our best year yet, Flirt Cupcakes is flourishing! I cannot wait to see what 2017 brings for us.

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Valentine Man-Cakes from 2016.

Though I have been a part of Flirt for over 3 years now I still have so much to learn,  that’s where school comes in. Very excited to bring back what I have learned and use it immediately at the shop.

Though I am still learning feel free to ask any questions or just come in and visit me at the shop any time. I love showing off what I have helped grow.

-Brianna Vallet (CupQueen)

Website link if you want to learn more!
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Naan: The Indian Flatbread

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I’m sure you all have heard about one of the most beloved bread, if not, the most beloved bread in India…the Naan bread!

If not…

Well…

Welcome to the Indian Cuisine, where naan bread is on almost every single restaurant menu and, is one of the most popular items on the list. It’s roots dig deep back all the way in 1500’s, where the naan bread used to be served only to the Mughal royalties at the time, which soon became one of their favourite dish alongside kebabs (Cafe Asia).  Many still believe to this day that naan bread was actually invented by the Persians, as that is where the word naan, is derived from the Persian word of “non”, which means bread. (DESIblitz).

Now…lets talk about the fun part of how naan breads are made:

Traditionally naan breads are made in their special oven called a tandoor. These tandoor’s are not only the home for naan breads, but, also host a variety of other Indian dishes such as chicken tikka and tandoori chicken. To see how Naan breads are made in a traditional way at most restaurants, watch this short clip by clicking here. However, naan breads could also be made at home in an oven, when set on broil mode.

Before we plunge ourselves into the secret of making a delicious homemade naan bread, here’s a fun fact for everyone: Did you know, that there are more than a dozen different varieties of naan bread? The ingredients and cooking procedures below are the basic steps for a regular naan bread. But, if you want to be adventurous, and spice up things a little bit, click here!

Today, I made lunch for my family which includes: naan bread, chickpea curry, and some seasoned potatoes alongside mint dip (chutney). I will break everything down into individual parts, but for now, lets look at the ingredients and steps for our delicious naan bread!

The ingredients for a naan bread are as follows:

  • All purpose flour – 3 cups
  • Warm milk – 3/4 cup
  • Yogurt – 1/2 cup
  • Instant yeast – 2 tsp
  • Sugar – 1 tsp
  • Salt – 1 tsp
  • Baking Powder – 1/2 tsp
  • Grated Garlic – 2 tbsp
  • Nigella seeds – 2 tsp
  • Finely chopped cilantro leaves

Method:

  • Sift flour along with salt and baking powder.
  • Put sifted flour, sugar and yeast in the mixing bowl.
  • Add yogurt and warm milk and start mixing on 1st speed for 2 minutes (I’m using a KitchenAid mixer).
  • Mix on speed 2 for 3-4 minutes.
  • Cover the dough and leave at warm place to rise (double the size). It takes approximately an hour and a half to rise up perfectly.
  • Divide the dough into small sized balls.
  • Roll the small sized ball with a rolling pin into a circular shape. To get a teardrop shape, simply place the naan on the palm of one hand, and stretch the other end of the elastic dough.
  • Season the naan with nigella seeds, garlic, and cilantro leaves.
  • Turn the oven on to the broil mode, and cook the Naan for 5-6 minutes.
  • Take out the naan, when it’s sides start turning brown.
  • Serve hot with a pat of butter on top.

Now that we have our flatbread good to go, lets take a look at the dish that it is most commonly served with…chickpea curry; or, as us Indians like to call it, chole! Chickpea curry is most commonly served with a kulcha: a thinner flatbread derived from the naan bread, which is more relevant in Northern India, as supposed to the naan bread which was only a huge success for the royalties in the southern parts of the country (The Indian Express). No matter the flatbread, the recipe for delicious chickpea curry is always the same. Here is a short clip of how it is made, before we dive down into other nitty-gritty details!

As a second item on the plate, I cooked some seasoned potatoes. The reason for this item is very simple: we love the savoury flavour with our flatbread. A simple dish as this one, requires simple ingredients and an even simpler cooking procedure! The potatoes were boiled, and seasoned with cumin seeds, parsley, basil, and cilantro leaves.

Lastly, virtually all Indian savoury dishes are incomplete without some sort of mint dip which we call chutney. This dip is a combination of cilantro leaves, mint leaves, lemon juice, onions, chopped green chillies, and salt all blended together. As per everything, additional toppings could be added for taste! (Mint dip recipe).

With the last bit of finishing touches, viola! Your hot and sizzling naan bread, with chickpea curry, seasoned potatoes and some mint dip is served!

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Thank you all for reading the blog!

Hope you all have a Naanlicious experience!

Narinder